The Engine 2 Blog

jane brody on healthy aging

Healthy Aging, With Nary a Supplement

By JANE E. BRODY
Published: January 11, 2010

The Great Recession, so I’m told, has been great for one segment of the economy — the makers of pills and potions that offer the promise of keeping people healthy. A middle-aged woman remarked as she perused the supplement shelves in my local health food store (I was buying bulgur): “I can’t afford to get sick. I lost my job and I have nohealth insurance.”

Each year millions of people fall prey to false promises that this, that or the other formula or fortified food can protect their hearts, prevent cancer, improve memory, strengthen their bones, uncreak their joints, build their muscles, even enable them to burn extracalories without moving.

The desire to achieve a healthy old age is laudable indeed, and will be even more so in the future. According to a projection of the century-long rise in life expectancypublished in The Lancet in October, more than half the children born since 2000 in wealthy countries can expect to celebrate their 100th birthday.

If so many of us are destined to become centenarians, it is all the more important to be able to enjoy those years unencumbered by chronic disease and disability. There is no virtue in simply living long; the goal should be to live long and well.

But while much is known about how to raise the odds of a healthy old age, only a minority of Americans incorporate into their lives what is likely to give them the biggest bang for their buck. Like the woman in the health food store, they’d rather rely on supplements of vitamins and minerals, fish oils and herbs, perhaps washed down with pricey antioxidant juices.

click here for the whole article: http://www.nytimes.com/2010/01/12/health/12brod.html

The Year of Meat; 2009 by Erik Marcus

You're right in NOT liking meat

More like...you're right in NOT liking meat

This is from the blog post of William Kruidenier.

“I haven’t been a regular reader of Erik Marcus’ Vegan.com blog, but I plan to start. He not only writes this blog but is the author of The Ultimate Vegan Guide and Meat Market: Animals, Ethics, and Money.

On his blog he has posted a 5,000 word piece titled “The Year in Meat: 2009″ which is a summary of noteworthy events in publishing, industry, media, and other venues related to animal welfare, veganism, factory farming, etc. It’s a quick and easy read and is filled with more than 175 links to relevant books, films, news items, web sites, and other resources that he mentions. A quick perusal revealed things I (not surprisingly) missed via the MSM—such as the attempt by some agribusiness leaders to prevent Washington State University from making Michael Pollan’s The Omnivore’s Dilemma required reading for 4,000 entering freshmen. When word of the censorship attempt got around, a WSU alumnus paid for the books and ensuredthey were made available. Or the gifts of beef by Texas cattlemen to fire houses in Texas after Austin, TX, firefighter Rip Esselstyn’s vegan diet book, The Engine 2 Diet, began making national headlines.

These and many other 2009 events are covered in Erik Marcus’ year-end review.”